Two Amazing Historic Fiction Books Out Today: The Other Bennet Sister and The Lady of the Ravens

Today, 9 January 2020 marks not only my best friend’s birthday (Happy Birthday Amy!) It also marks the release date of two amazing Historic Fiction books that I devoured within days of receiving them. First up:

The Other Bennet Sister by Janice Hadlow

Image copied from Goodreads

Star Rating: 5 Stars

I read this book during the festive season and it fitted in perfectly! A book about not fitting in, being an underdog, becoming a swan and true love, while under a blanket with a cup of cocoa and the Christmas tree lights twinkling set a romantic atmosphere.

The title says it all, The Other Bennet Sister, is the story of the least popular and outgoing Bennet sister from Jane Austin’s’: Pride and Prejudice. If you’ve been following my blog then you’ll know underdogs are my kryptonite! Until this book, I hadn’t spared a thought for Mary. She was always in her charismatic and beautiful siblings’ shadow and this is how the book starts. The first part is a retelling of Pride and Prejudice from Mary’s point of view and we discover a lonely character who has distanced herself and tries too hard to have her own qualities to stand upon. There is a beautiful heartbreaking sentence in this part of the book that describes it perfectly.

“Her hard work and effort had brought her the expertise she longed for, but it had been achieved at the cost of a simple enjoyment she once loved” Kindle Location 209.

This quote is appealing as I think we all have felt overshadowed and taken something we loved to such an extent that we lose sight of why we loved it to begin with. In this part, we also learn about the approval Mary desperately wishes for from her parents and how their marriage destroyed Mr. Bennet’s ability to bond with the younger girls and ultimately was to shape Mary’s view on marriage. Thus the book is set for Mary to learn about other marriages and to decide which model she believes to be the best.

The middle part is consumed with the Collins’ marriage. Poor Mary and Mr. Collins find friendship only to have Charlotte Lucas become jealous. Charlotte got my heckles up in this book, I was rooting for Mary to become Mrs. Collins especially as Collins’ depiction in this novel is so loving and Charlotte’s so cold.

The last part is where the novel comes into its own. Mary becomes a swan and emerges from her shell. So much so that she becomes caught in a love triangle. One suitor is steady and loving while the other is exciting and impulsive reminding the reader of echos of Darcy and Wickham. Luckily, Mary’s aunt has sound advice.

“The man who declared his affections most readily is not necessarily the man who feels them most profoundly.” Kindle Location 5237.

But, does Mary listen?

A truly wonderfully written tale of the novel Pride and Prejudice and I would highly recommend it.

Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for an E-ARC of this novel in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own.

The Lady of the Ravens by Joanna Hickson

Image copied from Goodreads

Star Rating: 4 Stars 

The Lady of the Ravens is a great idea for a book and I really enjoyed reading it. I’ve long been a fan of the Tudor Historical Fiction genre and got excited when I came across this book. The legend of the Ravens of the Tower is famous: it is believed that the Ravens are the guardians of the Tower of London. As long as the Tower of London stands so will the rule of the kingdom. The legend is so important that the Ravens are still looked after in the tower to this day and you can visit them. They have their own carers who look to their every need and to date they have never left the tower.

This legend is weaved into this novel. King Henry VII has won the throne of England, the country is trying to heal itself and soldiers don’t like ravens. We follow Lady Joan Gildford nee. Vaux from her time serving Princess Elizabeth of York after King Henry VII’s victory, to the alter and beyond to when she rises to the position of Maid of Honor. Joan is the Lady of the Ravens. She is enchanted by them and is a supporter of their survival and comfort. She knows of the Raven legend and the soldier’s dislike of them. They are used as target practice for archers and Joan makes sure that their bad opinions of them are changed. Beautifully, the ravens near misses coincide with troubles on King Henry VII’s throne, thus reinforcing the legend.

I’ve given this novel 4 stars as I felt some storylines felt incomplete and brushed over important issues. One of King Henry VII’s biggest threats was the presence of Perkin Warbeck, the Pretender. We don’t meet him in the book, he is only ever talked about yet he is talked about at great length. I expected more from this storyline as there was a lot of potential in the way this book is written; but the second half of his story, especially the capture, imprisonment, and execution was more of a footnote. The same can be said for Edward Plantagenet, Earl of Warwick. My other gripe with the novel is that it ended too soon. Prince Arthur and Queen Elizabeth were still alive at the end of the novel but Joan’s life became more dramatic after their deaths. Joan went to France with Princess Mary for her marriage to the King, she was part of King Henry the VIII’s great matter and she married a second time, to a youth she looked after in the novel. Perhaps a sequel to the book is coming… I hope so for there are many stories still to go and I’m very found of Joan and the Ravens.

Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for an E-ARC of this novel in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own.

Author: Zoe Pollock

I love reading books and all things book related!

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