A Light in the Depths by Christopher C. Fuchs Review

Image from www.earthpillarbooks.com

Publish Date 8 Feb 2020

Star Rating 5/5

Fuchs is back, with a powerful follow up to that cliff-hanger he left us with! A Light in the Depths is the second and final part of Rildning’s story which began in The Depths of Redemption. Unlike The Depths of Redemption Fuchs has changed his writing style back to character point of view charters, letting us get inside the minds of his vast cast.

The last book left us with the fall of Nalembalen and Rildning’s journal filled with New World secrets falling into the hands of the enemy. This book begins a year after the fall. The Gallerlanders still won’t use horses and metal leaving them vulnerable, they have won some victories but not enough. There is one last meaningful location left to the Gallerlanders, Gilgalem, and our heroes flee to it to prepare its defenses but allies are needed. Envoys are sent off in winter to potential allies, hoping to make common cause. Unfortunately, the enemy who are flowing across the New World have the same idea, making the Gallerlanders potential allies into their vassal-kings. Add to the mix: heart-rendering deaths, many a battle and seeing the great cities of Eglamour and Rachard be birthed and grown, The Light in the Depths becomes a book just can’t be put down, even for toilet breaks.

Unfortunately, I can’t go into more story without going into spoilers, so I will leave it here. However, I can do shout out to some of my favorite elements within this book. Hilsingor of Ned Gollen, Marshal of the Frontier Corps of Pemonia. is a fantastic character and a lover of wine, cheeses, and strategy, a person I could get along with in real life and gives off echoes of Sun Tzu. Then, there is a wolf among the sheep, an enemy operative who sits on the psychotic scale who successfully causes chaos from within while perfecting the perfect stick eye at Rildning. The Naren-Dra are impressive, I picture them as the Gods sitting in Olympia, watching the mortals below and messing with their life’s when they seem fit or come too close. Next, is a Macavalian Raffen vassal-king, willing to do whatever is needed regardless of what others think. Throughout, we are left to guess whether his surrender and adoption into the Brintilian Empire is sincere. But the biggest shout out goes to the creepy jailer of the Nyden. A sweet blind jailer who offers comfort in pitch dark cells only to help you by stabbing your eyes out through the cells’ keyhole. His scene was writing soo well mimicking gothic horror that it leaked into my nightmares. After all, what would you need your eyes for, in the dark, he was just helping…

A lot happened in this book, it’s well-paced and thoroughly engaging. It also, left a lot of room for future books, which is exciting. I would love to spend more time with the Naren-Dra and the Macavalian Raffen vassal-king. The only disappointing part: this book marks the end of Fuchs’s rapid release of books. Now comes the long wait…. luckily, I hear through the grapevine Fuchs will be publishing two new novelettes: Arcodum and The feuding Tower, this year to help tie us over until the next big book. If you haven’t already subscribe to the Earthpillar website, www.earthpillarbooks.com. By doing so, you get not just all the news about the upcoming releases, you also get Fuchs other two novelettes for free, The Revolution Machine and The Fourth Messenger. But ultimately, Christopher C. Fuchs write faster!

Thank you to Loremark Publishing for an E-ARC in exchange for an honest review.

The Depths of Redemption by Christopher C. Fuchs Review

Spoiler Warning – There are spoilers in this article about The Depths of Redemption

The Depths of Redemption is the second published novel by Christopher C. Fuchs. It is the first installment in a two-part prequel to his debut novel: Lords of Deception. It must be noted that this novel deviates from Lords of Deception as the main character is new to the reader, as well as his territory and adventure. This decision to explore the universe by spreading out histories and characters is refreshing and reminiscent of Terry Pratchett’s’ Discworld. A complaint I tend to have with authors who create universes is that once the main story has concluded the universe is forgotten. I much prefer to explore universes nooks and crannies!

This book is written in the first person, unlike the first novel which was written in character POV chapters. We begin with Arasemis and his pupil in the present looking at two ancient books that hold invaluable histories. One of the books is a journal and it is this journal that we dive 800 years into the past. The journal belongs to Rildning, a Colonial Knight who is undertaking an expedition to make an alliance between New Lorin of the Old World and the natives of the New World, Pemonia. They start off as a strong group of five however as they delve deeper into the New World, the New World begins picking them off and the true dark purpose of the expedition comes to light. Rildning, fight for survival in the unknown wilderness and his hope to find a greater meaning to his existence means he undergoes major character changes and becomes a prisoner of the natives. Luckily his changed character is enough to win the native’s trust but the Old World is coming for the New and a great army sits on the fringes of the native’s capital city. Unbeknown to all but a select few, the capital city is harboring a secret, one which could produce lasting peace or utter destruction. Rildnings’ journal, originally written to record the assignment of creating an alliance suddenly becomes a dangerous weapon, if the enemy ever got their hands on it.

Within the wilderness of the New World Fuchs has created a fantastical environment that is beautiful but when it becomes dark, it becomes dark! Not to mention a new language which as readers we begin to learn ourselves through the journal. The number of creative elements within this novel are staggering. Though judging by the debut novel, this is not surprising.

My only complaint is that I really like the character of Orren. Since he was so right about his speculations of the New World and stood a figure of ridicule for it. I would have loved to have seen him be proven right and explore the world he suspected existed. Unfortunately, I have to admit that a character cannot survive in a story just because I want him to be triumphant, his gentle soul had to depart to keep the story authentic. He could never have survived the dangers of this adventure no matter how true his heart was. I wish that he had lived but I like an author who’s not afraid to kill a character for the sake of the story. It hurt in a way George R. R. Martin specializes in….and he was only a tiny part of the book and his death was off-screen!

Lords of Redemption is out today: 8th December 2019. Get your copy now from Amazon, Waterstones, Barnes and Nobels or ISBN 978-1-946883-02-5 at your local bookshop.